The Effects of Healthy Diet in Pregnancy

  • Fateme Davari Tanha Mail Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Medical school, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mona Mohseni Department of Neuroscience, Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mahsa Ghajarzadeh Department of Neuroscience, Imam Hospital, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
  • Mamak Shariat Department of Epidemiology, Feto-maternal Research Center, Tehran University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran.
Keywords:
Education, Healthy Habits, Pregnancy

Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the importance of observing healthy habits by pregnant women that influences different aspects of mother and fetus health, we assessed the change in dietary behavior, and cigarette smoking after distributing the guidelines among 485 prenatal care patients.|
Materials and methods:
The subjects were pregnant women who enrolled in health care centers of Tehran University from September, 18, 2010 to July 21, 2012. At first the standard questionnaires including questions about socio demographic factors and also their dietary behavior, and cigarette smoking were filled out. Then we gave them the guideline. After 2 months the participants received the similar questionnaires. The change in their behavior was evaluated comparing the 2 series of questionnaires by SPSS-16 analysis methods.
Results:
Totally 1.9% of participants met fruit & vegetable guidelines before education & 5.6% after that (3.7% rise) (p< 0.0001). In studied group 99% met cigarette smoking guidelines before & 100% after education. There was a meaningful association between the amount of fruit & vegetables consumption before and after pregnancy (p< 0.0001).
Conclusion:
According to the significant effect of education, we can apply it as an effective way of improving the healthy behaviors in our society. Furthermore, discovering related factors to healthy behavior can lead to addressing the most appropriate (needy, necessitous, deserving) group of population for education.

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How to Cite
1.
Tanha FD, Mohseni M, Ghajarzadeh M, Shariat M. The Effects of Healthy Diet in Pregnancy. J Fam Reprod Health. 7(3):121-5.
Section
Original Articles