Shift Work Effects and Pregnancy Outcome: A Historical Cohort Study

  • Mohammad Hossein Davari Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
  • Elham Naghshineh Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
  • Mehrdad Mostaghaci Occupational Medicine Specialist Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
  • Seyyed Jalil Mirmohammadi Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
  • Maryam Bahaloo Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
  • Abbas Jafari Health and Environment, Department of Management Planning and Environmental Education, Tehran University, Tehran, Iran
  • Amir Houshang Mehrparvar Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
Keywords: Pregnancy, Shift Work, Working Women, Pregnancy Complications

Abstract

Objective: Employed mothers face considerable amount of hazards. Especially shift work can impact pregnant women by affecting some hormones. This study was conducted to assess the adverse effects of shift work on pregnancy outcomes.Materials and methods: This historical cohort study was conducted in 2017 in order to assess the effect of shift work on pregnancy outcomes. The subjects were consecutively selected from pregnant women, which referred to Al Zahra and Shahid Beheshti hospitals, Isfahan, Iran for their pregnancy care. The effect of shift work on pregnancy and labor complications (low birth weight, small for gestational age, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, intra-uterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortion, preterm delivery, excessive bleeding during labor, and type of labor) was assessed. The effect was adjusted for occupation and number of children as well. Data were analyzed by SPSS (ver. 17) usingT-test, chi-Square test and logistic regression analysis.Results: Totally, 429 pregnant women entered the study. There was not a statistically significant difference between morning and shift workers regarding age. It was found that shift work probably increases the incidence of small for gestational age, pre-eclampsia and eclampsia, intra-uterine growth retardation, spontaneous abortion, and preterm delivery, but after adjustment for job and number of children the effect was observed only on preterm delivery.Conclusion: Working in a rapid cycling schedule of shift work may cause an increase in the incidence of preterm delivery in pregnant mothers.

Author Biographies

Mohammad Hossein Davari, Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
Assistant Professor of Occupational & Environmental Medicine
Elham Naghshineh, Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
Associate Professor of Obstetrics and Gynecology
Mehrdad Mostaghaci, Occupational Medicine Specialist Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
Occupational Medicine Specialist
Seyyed Jalil Mirmohammadi, Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
Professor of Occupational & Environmental Medicine
Amir Houshang Mehrparvar, Industrial Disease Research Center, Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
Professor of Occupational & Environmental Medicine

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Published
2018-10-21
How to Cite
1.
Davari MH, Naghshineh E, Mostaghaci M, Mirmohammadi SJ, Bahaloo M, Jafari A, Mehrparvar AH. Shift Work Effects and Pregnancy Outcome: A Historical Cohort Study. J Fam Reprod Health. 12(2):84-88.
Section
Original Articles