Comparison of Two Statistical Methods to Determine Normal Range of Androgen Hormones: K-Means Cluster Analysis and Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve

  • Fahimeh Ramezani Tehrani Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Khaled Rahmani Department of Community Medicine, Social Determinants of Health Research Center, Research Institute for Health Development, Kurdistan University of Medical Sciences, Sanandaj, Iran.
  • Ali Moradi Health Deputy, Hamadan University of Medical Sciences, Hamadan, Iran
  • Seyed Ali Montazeri Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Razieh Bidhendi Yarandi Reproductive Endocrinology Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran
  • Fatemeh Darabi Department of Public Health, Asadabad School of Medical Sciences, Asadabad, Iran
Keywords: Androgen Hormones, K-Means Cluster Analysis, Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve

Abstract

Objective: To assess and compare the normal ranges of androgen hormones level, total testosterone (TT), free testosterone (FT), dehydrotestosterone (DHT), androstenedione (A4), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), and dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS), in Iranian women based on different statistical methods.Materials and methods: This study was conducted on previous data collected in Iranian PCOS Prevalence Study, which details have been published before. A total of 1772 women of 18-45 years were recruited from urban areas of five randomly selected provinces in different geographic regions of Iran. The natural range of androgen hormones was determined and compared by two statistical methods including k-means cluster analysis, and receiver operating characteristic curve.Results: In women younger than 35 years old with any BMI, cut-off points obtained for FAI hormone were in lower percentiles; however, in older women, the results of the two methods were almost the same. Cut-off points of DHEAS in under 35 years old women of normal and obese weight and women older than 35 years old with normal weight calculated by ROC curve method was in higher percentiles than that in the cluster analysis method. In >35 years obese women, obtained cut-off points for DHEAS ROC curve was in lower percentiles in comparison to cluster analysisConclusion: Although our study depicts the differences among the cutoff values among two statistical methods; however, lacking a gold standard test to define hyperandrogenism, we need further studies to obtain more comprehensive results.

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Published
2018-09-23
How to Cite
1.
Ramezani Tehrani F, Rahmani K, Moradi A, Montazeri SA, Bidhendi Yarandi R, Darabi F. Comparison of Two Statistical Methods to Determine Normal Range of Androgen Hormones: K-Means Cluster Analysis and Receiver Operating Characteristic Curve. J Fam Reprod Health. 12(2):96-102.
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Original Articles